Leon Sheffield, Licensed Notary Signing Agent


Services


LEON SHEFFIELD NOTARY SERVICE

Direct Line: 305-923-3981

E-mail 1: LSheffield10@gmail.com


Common Notarial Acts


The information presented on this page was collected from public and private sources and is provided as a service of the

United States Notary Association.


No attempt was made to interpret state or federal laws or dispense legal advice.


Notarial Act Description/Notary’s Role States where authorized


Acknowledgment

An acknowledgment includes two essential elements. The first is the oral, formal declaration made by a


person who signed a document indicating that the signature is genuine and that signing the document


was a free will act performed for the purposes indicated by the document. This declaration is made by


the signer in the presence of a notary. The second part is the notary’s certificate, a written statement that


the signer person did appear in person, was satisfactorily identified, and made the oral acknowledgment.


This notarial act is authorized in and follows the same or similar process in each of the 50 states and the


District of Columbia.


AK, AL, AR, AZ, CA, CO,


CT, DC, DE, FL, GA, HI, IA,


ID, IL, IN, KS, KY, LA, MA,


MD, ME, MI, MN, MO, MS,


MT, NC, ND, NE, NH, NJ,


NM, NV, NY, OH, OK, OR,


PA, RI, SC, SD, TN, TX, UT,


VA, VT, WA, WI, WY, WV


Affidavit/Jurat

Generally, as a notarial act, an affidavit is a voluntary, written, sworn statement signed in the presence of


a notary. In some states,

jurat refers only to the notary’s certificate on a sworn statement. In others, jurat


is used instead of or interchangeably with

affidavit. In a few others, such as MI and NJ, the definition of


jurat includes both affidavits and verifications. The 19 states where affidavits are not expressly


authorized, the provision is made through the authorization to administer oaths, witness signatures, and


certify the same.


AR, AZ, CA, CO, CT, FL, GA,


IA, ID, IN, LA, MA, ME, MI,


MN, MS, MT, NC, NE, NH,


NJ, NM, NV, NY, OH, PA, RI,


SC, TN, UT, VA, VT, WI


Certify/Attest Copy

To certify or attest a copy of a document, a notary photocopies a document, supervises the photocopying


of document, or compares a previously photocopied document to its original, and then certifies that the


copy is identical to its original. Most states that allow notaries to perform this duty specify the


documents eligible for copy certification by a notary. For example, all states prohibit notaries from copy


certifying state-issued birth certificates. Several states indicate that notaries may not certify copies of


documents that are to be publicly recorded. Many states that do not allow notaries to certify copies make


a provision for the individual desiring the certify copy to make the copy, go before a notary, and sign a


sworn statement regarding the authenticity of the copy.


AR, AZ, CO, DE, FL, GA, IA,


ID, KS, LA, MA, ME, MO,


NH, NM, NV, OK, OR, PA,


SC, TX, UT, VA, VT, WA,


WI, WV


Special

:, -journal only AL,


CA, MD, MS, MT, -POA only


CA


Witness/Attest/Verify


signature/Attest


execution/Attest signer


identity


Witnessing or attesting signatures is a notarial act in which the notary determines that a signature is that


of the person appearing before the notary and the one named in the document, and then certifies the


same. This determination is usually accomplished by witnessing the signature as it is made. The


certificate for this notarial act differs from an acknowledgment and an affidavit/jurat in that there is no


statement that the signer acknowledged his execution of an instrument or swore to or affirmed the


truthfulness of statements in or on the document signed. There is only the statement by the notary that


signature was made in the presence of the notary. In some states, the notary, in attesting a signature,


must also certify the proper identification of the signer.


DC, DE, GA, HI, IL, KS, MA,


MD, NC,NH, OK, OR, WA,


WI, WY


Proof/Proof by subscribing


witness/Proof of


execution/Witness proof


Acknowledgments chiefly are used to prove signatures on deeds and other publicly recorded documents.


However, in some states, recorders may accept other “proofs,” the mainly affidavits of subscribing


witnesses who attest to the circumstances under which an instrument was signed by the principal.


AK, AL, CA, CO, LA, MT,


ND, NE, NJ, NV, NY, SC, TX


Oath/Affirmation/Swear


witness


All notaries have statutory authority to administer oaths and affirmations. Nearly all states have some


restrictions on to whom and in what situations an oath may be administered by a notary. For example,


generally, a notary may not administer an oath of office to a notary or any oath required in a military


setting. Oaths and affirmations normally are administered by notaries to affiants, deponents, and those


entering public office. Some states specify that notaries also are authorized to administer oaths and


affirmations to witnesses called to give testimony in a court of law.


AK, AL, AR, AZ, CA, CO,


CT, DC, DE, FL, GA, HI, IA,


ID, IL, IN, KS, KY, LA, MA,


MD, ME, MI, MN, MO, MS,


MT, NC, ND, NE, NH, NJ,


NM, NV, NY, OH, OK, OR,


PA, RI, SC, SD, TN, TX, UT,